Monitoring Your HPC Cluster

Linux has detailed story on how to monitor your linux cluster with Ganglia:
“Ganglia consists of several components designed specifically for the different aspects of monitoring, collecting, and displaying metrics from HPC systems in an efficient and scalable way. It was originally written by Matt Massie at the University of California, Berkeley (unsurprisingly, Ganglia was released under a BSD license), and is actively maintained by a small group of developers. Ganglia is used by commercial, educational, government, and non-profit organizations across the world to monitor some of the largest clusters currently in operation. A partial, but still impressive, list of organizations using Ganglia can be found on the Ganglia homepage. The current stable release is ganglia-3.1.0. This new release has a number of improvements over the previous 3.0.x series, including a new modular interface for adding metrics directly to gmond (with C and Python bindings), the addition of several new core metrics, and a number of display improvements. While the screenshots below were taken using version 3.0.5, the setting up a new Ganglia 3.1.0 installation is essentially the same.” Full Story
And if any of my colleagues read this and care to comment how some of Sun’s new xVM system management offerings compare, I’d love to write that up 😉

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About Rich
FlexRex began his life as a cartoon character I created a Sun Microsystems. As the world's first "fictional blogger," he appeared in numerous parody films that made fun of the whole work-from-home thing. Somewhere along the line, the Sun IT department adopted FlexRex as their spokesman in a half-dozen security awareness films for employees. So when I left Sun recently, I started FlexRex Communications, a Marketing company in Portland, Oregon.

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